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Home >  RPG  >   Sekiro Shadows Die Twice
Sekiro Shadows Die Twice

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Description

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice is a brutally hard action game from the makers of Dark Souls and Bloodborne that will force you to master the art of fighting with a katana – and unlike Dark Souls, you won’t be able to use magic to cheat your way through the game. You’ll have to get good.

The phrase “git gud” has been a meme in the Dark Souls community for years. Due to the game’s relatively high difficulty, players who normally breeze through other games frequently find themselves stuck on hard levels or bosses. While many puzzles and bosses are vulnerable to particular strategies, this isn’t always the case. Some bosses require you to learn their patterns, practice your dodges, and maintain your focus for the duration of their life bar. In other words, nobody can give you a quick tip that will let you beat the boss. You’ll have to get good at the game.

In many ways, Sekiro is a Dark Souls game that’s been polished around the idea of forcing you to get good. Sekiro doesn’t have the same varied weapon selection, massive list of magic, or overpowered summons that Dark Souls or Elden Ring offer. Instead, you’ve got a katana and a small handful of tools that let you do somewhat limited actions in combat. You might be able to jump into the air and deal massive damage to an airborne enemy, swing a giant sword made of fire, or use an umbrella to block certain kinds of attacks, but you certainly can’t blast enemies from the edge of their vision range or channel massive energy beams that one shot a boss. In other words, Sekiro forces you to fight like a samurai.

This is very much a good thing. Unlike the aforementioned Souls games, Sekiro knows exactly what you can do at every point in the game. Early on, it forces you to master fighting by deflecting enemy attacks, using movement as an avoidance tool, and pouncing on opportunities to hit enemies from behind. As the game progresses, new enemies and bosses challenge your mastery of these concepts. Attacks become faster, more varied, and difficult to parry, enemies have bigger moves that require more precise movement, and the game asks you to use your increasingly large arsenal of prosthetic tools while you dodge, deflect, and slice your way to victory. Not only is the difficulty curve superbly crafted, but the later enemies are a fantastic blend of difficulty and fun. The game’s designers knew that you’d be a guy with a katana, and as a result, they were able to tailor the experience to be incredible.

This isn’t to say that Sekiro is just Dark Souls with a katana. In many ways, the game resembles something like Ninja Gaiden more than Dark Souls or Elden Ring. Non-boss encounters often involve stealth and movement as you dart around with a grappling hook and dispatch enemies with backstabs. The game’s sneaking mechanics are arguably its weakest point, but the fluidity with which you can maneuver around the map more than makes up for it.

How to play

Sekiro has a fairly well fleshed-out story, told more directly than the stories of other From Software games. More importantly, however, it has a mode that allows you to replay earlier bosses whenever you’d like, in any order. This means that you can showcase your mastery of a particular mechanic to your friends or just play through some of the game’s most fun encounters without having to deal with puzzles, enemy monsters, or story requirements. It’s a great addition that really helps sell the package.

While the difficulty curve in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice is very rewarding as the game progresses, it’s worth noting that the game starts off very, very hard. It’s certainly not impossible, but you’re almost certainly going to die a LOT as you get your feet wet and learn how to handle your blade. Luckily, there’s hardly any penalty for dying. In fact, in many circumstances, you can just pop back up on your feet right where you fell and get back to fighting. It’s much more forgiving in this respect than Dark Souls, enabling you to embrace the grind and experiment more than you might be able to in other games.

The best way to get good at Sekiro is to spend some time experimenting and dying. Unlike other games, death shouldn’t be a deterrent for your journey through Sekiro. Instead, it should be a data point. If you tried doing something and got killed for it, make a mental note of what you did, how you died, and how you might be able to refine your strategy in the future. In many cases, a tiny refinement is the only difference between dying immediately and pulling off a flawless victory. If you get sad or upset when you die, you might not figure out that refinement. If you’re relaxed and trying to learn, you’ll have a much better shot at figuring things out.

One powerful tip that will propel you through the game is to use your ears. When you first fight a boss or powerful enemy, try just blocking or getting hit while they go through their list of attacks. Pay attention to the timing and rhythm of each attack string and do your best to memorize the cadence of these attacks. When you go back, start trying to parry those strings at the timings you heard earlier. You might need to adjust a few hits here and there, but you’ll get a great starting point that you can adjust as you go.

Finally, Sekiro can be a very frustrating game. It’s totally okay to get angry or sad at a difficult boss or level. The feeling of frustration helps to amp up the jubilation you feel when you finally get past it. If you find yourself getting extremely frustrated, however, it might be a good idea to take a break or at least change up your surroundings. Put on some music, try a different weapon, and try to approach the challenge with a different mindset. Consider changing your goal from ‘kill the boss’ to ‘parry each attack once’ or ‘use a tool a certain number of times.’ These attempts will give your brain a chance to relax and figure out new strategies and tactics that you can use when you’ve calmed down a little bit.

Are you a sekiro master? What was your favorite boss? Did we miss any tips or tricks? Let us know in the comments below!

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  • Bynathan
    soo good
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